THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Lest we forget
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THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:42 am

On the night of 19th October 1917, a Navy L45 Zeppelin dropped a 600kg bomb which destroyed a row containing three houses, a fish and chip shop and a doctor’s surgery, killing 12 people and injuring a further 24.
BLITZ, Calmington Road,Albany Road, 1917..jpg
Calmington Road,Albany Road, 1917.
Calmington Road, Plaque..jpg
Calmington Road, Plaque.After the Second World War the houses in this area where removed to make way for Burgess Park and the plaque was moved to the Southwark Council offices in Chumleigh Gardens.


I came across this story that relates to these pictures, concerning these three very brave men.

During the night of October 19-20, 1917 a German Zeppelin dropped a 300lb ordnance, known as an aerial torpedo, on to two adjoining houses on the corner of Calmington Road and Albany Road.
The victims of the air raid are remembered on the memorial in nearby Chumleigh Gardens, but three brave policemen, who attended the terrible scene, have been forgotten.
Despite the threat of another explosion due to a gas leak, Inspector Frederick Wright, PC Jesse Christmas and PC Robert Melton raced to the scene – then in the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell, now in Southwark borough.
It must have been terrifying, voluntarily entering the inferno, not knowing what they would find.
People remember the horrors of the London Blitz of 1940/41 but men, women and children were also killed in air raids during the First World War.
PC Melton was off duty at the time, just a few houses down from the explosion at 24 Albany Road with his wife, Kate, and their two young children, Ethel and George.
All three officers were based at the police station in Walworth Road, popularly known as Carter Street police station.
On their arrival at the scene, the brave Camberwell bobbies cut a hole in the floor and dropped down into the basement, where they managed to find two children in the smoke and chaos.
Ignoring the threat of the building collapsing and the near-overpowering gas fumes, they led the children and a group of shell-shocked adults to safety.
Inspector Wright collapsed, received medical care, went home, and then returned to his rescue efforts later on in the night.
An eye witness spoke of “the great bravery” of the three police officers in a letter to a local paper that week.
He said: “I can assert that their conduct was exemplary, deserving the highest possible praise and public gratitude.”
Inspector Frederick Wright was awarded the Albert Medal for his bravery, while the two police constables were decorated with the King’s Police Medals.
But what became of the three brave bobbies? PC Jesse Christmas and his wife Frances lived at 33 Aylesbury Road in Walworth and in 1919 they welcomed a son, Leslie, into their family.
They later moved to Wandsworth where Jesse died in 1979. Inspector Wright retired in 1920 after 31 years’ service but PC Robert Melton did not remain in the Met Police.
After the First World War, Robert supported a national campaign to improve the pay and conditions of police officers, he even went on strike.
In the Met, 1,056 of the 18,200 police officers employed came out on strike, but this was against the rules and they were all sacked, including Robert.
Robert Melton continued to live with his family at 24 Albany Road and, after being sacked, he took a job as a Gate Keeper at the Rotherhithe docks. Tragedy struck on July 1 1934 when he died from heart failure at the age of 53.
Three selfless and brave policemen who put themselves in incredible danger to try to save the lives of others.
Last edited by kiwi on Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:39 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Tue Oct 24, 2017 3:59 am

Old Kent Road.jpg
OLD KENT ROAD.

Disabled veterans learn new crafts at a factory on the Old Kent Road London circa 1919 Mr F Jackson who lost one arm and Mr H Grinter DCM MM who lost. Not sure but I assume a leg or legs, brave men whose lives were changed for ever. LESS WE FORGET!

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THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:46 pm

OLD KENT ROAD FACTORY, WORLD WAR 1,1914-1918.jpg
Women Working in A Boot Repairing Factory Old Kent Road, World War 1, 1914-1918.
OLD KENT ROAD,ROYAL ARMY CLOTHING DEPARTMENT WW 1,1914-18..jpg
Female workers cutting leather for army boots in the Royal Army Clothing Department, Old Kent Road, 1914-1918

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THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Mon Jan 29, 2018 1:57 am

I think this is possible where the Surrey Docks Farm is now? (2017).
Ambulance shelter at the Receiving Station Southwark..jpg
Ambulance shelter at the Receiving Station Southwark.

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THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Sun Sep 02, 2018 12:33 am

Wansey St, Elephant & Castle, Army Recruiting Office 1915 WW1.jpg
Wansey St, Elephant & Castle, Army Recruiting Office 1915 WW1.
Walworth Town Hall, during Lord Derby’s recruitment campaign

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THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:02 am

The Fey family, who appeared to have lived in Bermondsey during the WW1.
Albert Edward Fey is understood to have served in the 9th (Machine Gun) Battalion Royal Naval Division during WWI. Albert Edward Fey & Ellen Sarah Elliston, married in1907, when they were both 23. Pictured with their three children Annie Florence Fey b.1908 Ethel Caroline Fey b.1910 and Albert Edward Fey junior b.1913. Photo Angles Studio 110 Southwark Park Road.
The other picture taken at EC Watling studio, based at 33 Jamaica Road, Bermondsey, shows a young girl dressed up as a soldier, the young girl appears to be wearing her father’s trench cap and kit, a leather bandolier, water bottle and what looks like a haversack.
THE FEY FAMILY, Annie,Ethel, Albert, dad Albert & wife Ellen c 1913 9th (Machine Gun) Battalion Royal Naval Division during WWI. X.jpg
THE FEY FAMILY The picture was, taken at EC Watling studio, based at 33 Jamaica Road, in Bermondsey, the young girl appears to be wearing her father’s trench cap and kit, a leather bandolier.jpg

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THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Tue Apr 02, 2019 11:36 pm

LEST WE FORGET.jpg

COX, W. H. 1st Class Stoker, R.N. Serving in H.M.S. "Astria" at the outbreak of hostilities, he did good service in this ship which was engaged with the Grand Fleet in the North Sea, and later in the Mediterranean. Later he was aboard H.M.S. "Cornwallis" when she was blown up by an enemy torpedo, and was discharged as unfit for further service in December 1919. He holds the 1914-15 Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals. 72, Fawcett Road, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

CRAMER, G. R., Driver, R.A.S.C. (M.T.) He volunteered in April 1915, and four months later proceeded to France, where he was employed in the transport of ammunition and supplies in the Ypres, Ploegsteert, Somme, Messines and Cambral sectors. He served at Bethune with the 71st Siege Battery, and took part in the Retreat and Advance of 1918. Returning home, he was demobilised in March 1919, and holds the 1914-15 Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals.
54, Cherry Gardens Street, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

CLAYDON, F., Sapper, R.E. He joined in 1916, and in the same year was drafted overseas, seeing service in many sectors of the Western Front, particularly the Somme, Ypres, and Arras, until the close of hostilities. He was demobilised in 1919, and holds the General Service and Victory Medals.
80, Trundleys Road, Deptford, S.E.8.

CLAYTON, W. G., Sergt., 12th East Surrey Regt. Volunteering in July 1915, he crossed to France in May of the following year, and took part in the Battles of the Somme, Beaumont-Hamel, Arras, Ypres, Passchendaele, and in various minor engagements. In November 1927, he proceeded to Italy, and experienced much fighting on the Piave, but returned to the Western Front in time for the Retreat and Advance of 1918. After the Armistice he was sent with the Army of Occupation into Germany, and served on the Rhine. He was demobilised in February 1919, and holds the General Service and Victory Medals.
32, Seaford Buildings, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

WW1 12th Bermondsey Battalion East Surrey Regiment collar badge    X.jpg
WW1 12th Bermondsey Battalion East Surrey Regiment collar badge


CLEARY, W., Steward, R.N.R., and Driver, R.A.S.C. He joined in August 1915, and for a time was engaged on important war duties in s.s. "Wilster" and "Sauterams." He also saw service in H.M.S. "Sunhill," "Chauguinola," and "Monea," and did valuable patrol work with the Grand Fleet in the North Sea. In February 1918 he was transferred to the Army, and with the Royal Army Service Corps did excellent transport work on many sectors of the Western Front in the last stages of hostilities. Demobilised in October 1919, he holds the 1914-15 Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals.
29, Crauham Road, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.
Last edited by kiwi on Mon Jul 29, 2019 3:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Sat Apr 06, 2019 12:25 am

THREE BRAVE MEN FROM THE SAME FAMILY

CRACKNELL, F., Private, Bedfordshire Regiment. Volunteering in September 1914, he passed through his training and was drafted to France in July of the following year, seeing much heavy fighting at various points of the line. On September 27th 1916, whilst taking part in the later stages of the great Offensive on the Somme he gave his life for King and Country, and was entitled to the 1914-15 Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals. His body lies in Thiepval Cemetery.
"Nobly striving, He nobly fell that we might live."
11, Galleywall Road, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

CRACKNELL, H., Private, Bedfordshire Regiment. Joining in January 1918, he proceeded in the following July to the Western Front after his training, and did duty as a hospital attendant, until he was eventually demobilised in December 1919. He holds the General Service and Victory Medals.
11. Galleywall Road, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

CRACKNELL, H., Private, R.A.S.C. (M.T.) Volunteering in May 1915, he proceeded to Egypt at the end of the same year, and later to Salonika, where he rendered good service in connection with engagements on the Vardar and Struma rivers, also at Monastir. He continued to carry out the duties of transport on that front to the end of the campaign, and was finally demobilised in March 1919. He holds the 1914-15 Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals.
11, Galleywall Road, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

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Re: THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Tue May 14, 2019 2:12 am

Possibly from the same family?

CLEAK, A. E.,Pte.,14th London Regt.(London Scottish) He volunteered in 1914, and in the same year proceeded to France, where he saw much heavy fighting at La Bassee, Ypres, Neuve Chapelle, the Somme, Cambrai, and many other engagements until hostilities ceased. After his return home he was demobilised in 1919, and holds the 1914-15 Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals.
89, Clarence Street, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

CLEAK, T. W., Private, 2nd Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Mobilised in August 1914, he was soon afterwards drafted to France, and fought gallantly in the memorable Retreat from Mons. He was unfortunately killed in action in 1915, and was entitled to the Mons Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals.
"His life for his Country, his soul to God."
89, Clarence Street, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

CLEAK, C. H., Pte., Queen's (R. West Surrey Regt.) Joining in March 1918, he embarked shortly afterwards for France, and there took an active part in various engagements in the Advance of the Allies of that year. After the Armistice he was sent to Germany, and served with the Army of Occupation on the Rhine. He was demobilised in October 1919, and holds the General Service and Victory Medals.
23, Odessa Street, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

CLEAK, F. C. C., Private, M.G.C. He joined in September 1916, and in the following year was drafted to Egypt. He did much valuable service there and in Palestine for a time, but later proceeded to France, and fought at Ypres, and Cambrai. He was unhappily killed in action in the Somme sector in 1918, and was entitled to the General Service and Victory Medals.
"He joined the great white company of valiant souls."
13, Melledge Street, Rotherhithe, S.E.16. .

CLEAK, W. G. E., A.B., R.N., H.M.S. "Queen Elizabeth." He volunteered in October 1915, and after his training at the Crystal Palace and Portsmouth, proceeded to Scapa Flow. He was subsequently engaged on important escort and convoy work in the North Sea and the Atlantic, and on one occasion his vessel was torpedoed, but he was picked up by an English destroyer and landed at Dover. After much valuable service he was demobilised in June 1919, and holds the 1914-15 Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals.
1, Hatteraick Street, Rotherhithe, S.E.16.

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Re: THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918

Postby kiwi » Sun Feb 02, 2020 11:28 pm

HMS Hogue was torpedo by U9 and sunk on 22/09/1914. These are some of the brave men from our area who lost their lives when HMS HOGUE was sunk in WW1. All remembered on Chatham Naval Memorial.

BARTLETT, JOE (53), Armourer's Crew (no. 135647), HMS Hogue, Royal Navy, †22/09/1914, Husband of Emily A. Le Goubey (formerly Bartlett), of 284, Southwark Park Rd., Bermondsey, London. Awarded East and West African Medal (Benin Expedition).

GOULD, ROBERT STEPHEN (26), Able Seaman (no. 226881), HMS Hogue, Royal Fleet Reserve, †22/09/1914, Son of Alfred and Maud Gould, of London; husband of Mary Anna Gould, of 41, Ambrose St., Bermondsey, London.

MORPHEW, ERNEST , Stoker 1st Class (no. SS/103605), HMS Hogue, Royal Fleet Reserve, †22/09/1914, Son-in-law of Mrs. C. Moreton, of 1, Amelia St., Walworth, London.

MORRIS, JOHN (41), Leading Stoker (no. 151804), HMS Hogue, Royal Navy, †22/09/1914, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. Son of George and Jane Morris, of Kennington, London; husband of Eleanor Sarah Morris, of 64, Guinness Buildings, Page's Walk, Bermondsey, London.

ROSSER, JOHN, Able Seaman, (no. 207934), Royal Fleet Reserve, Son of John Elmore Rosser, of Walworth, London; husband of Annie Matilda Rosser, of 51, Portland St., Walworth, London.

HMS Hogue was torpedo and sunk by U9 on 22-09-1914, with the loss of 375 lives.  X.png
HMS Hogue was torpedo and sunk by U9 on 22-09-1914.

On that terrible day over 375 crew died, all brave people who gave their lives in the name of WAR. :(
LEST WE FORGET.jpg


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