Tooley Street

Yesterday & Today
How we lived then & How we live now
fosney
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Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Fri Mar 03, 2017 4:19 pm

Tooley Street - St Olave's Church

St Olave's, is the Anglicanised version of St Olaf. St Olaf was the Viking Chief who attacked London by river in 1009 AD and tore down the London Bridge of that time.
St Olave's was located near Winchester Palace, residence of the Bishop of Winchester. At this time the area was part of the diocese of Winchester and remained as such until 1877. To the West stood St Mary Overy Church, later enlarged to become Southwark Cathedral.
In 1736 St Olave's was renown for being the last church in London to possess four aisles and three rows of pillars - but it later fell into disrepair. As a consequence of digging graves too close to the church the whole of the North side fell down - the steeple and most of the church was rebuilt.
The fire of 1843 in Tooley Street destroyed the Church, leaving only the tower and the bare walls - but the pulpit was saved and the church was again rebuilt. It was finally demolished in 1928.
The present building on the site is St Olaf House, constructed between 1929/1931 - now a Grade II listed building, it became the Head Office of Hays Wharf - an art deco building designed by Harry Stuart Goodhart-Rendal and is now a part of the London Bridge Hospital.
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fosney
Posts: 836
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Fri Mar 03, 2017 4:20 pm

Toole

staying in Tooley Street picture from 1905 looking east todays picture what more can we say
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fosney
Posts: 836
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Fri Mar 03, 2017 4:23 pm

Tooley Street - Chamberlain's Wharf
After a long history of serving as a riverside wharf it became another victim of the dock and wharf closures during the 1960s/70s.
This Grade II listed building is now part of London Bridge Hospital.
1. Chamberlain's Wharf from Tooley Street
2. Chamberlain's Wharf 1846
3. Chamber``lain's Wharf 1938
4. Chamberlain's Wharf today - part of London Bridge Hospital.
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fosney
Posts: 836
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Fri Mar 03, 2017 4:25 pm

Tooley Street --Post Office

Picture of one of the two Tooley Street Post Offices around 1960. I have been trying to place where in Tooley Street it was and according to the map number 61 was between Hays Lane and Battle Bridge Lane so todays picture is the area where I think it was.
If I am wrong and anyone has any knowledge of this Post Office or can remember it please put me right
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fosney
Posts: 836
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Wed Mar 08, 2017 2:23 pm

Posted by glengallarms


good afternoon fosney,i cant believe i am still driving down tooley st on my way in to work.all those years my old dad worked behind the police station for hays transport/butlers wharf.how it has all changed.i had all my growing up life in bermondsey being born in guys hospital and liviving in manciple st then old kent rd and going to paragon school.there are just so many wonderful memories on here,so many fantastic contributions .although i moved away 10 years ago to sittingbourne in kent,i still work in southwark st.another memory just coming back to me was the big sports shop on the old kent rd called john bennett, my mum bought me my first football kit there when i was about 9 years of age and would you adam and eve it, it was a wolverhamton kit in bright orange and i surpported millwall,my mum and dad are no longer with us now but they was well known in bermondsey,my dad had severn brothers by the name of cooper and all lived in the manciple st area and my mum had the tea stall on the antique market for a few years.another memory just coming back as i write is paragon school catching fire.it was the top /roof part of the school in about 1971,we was just returning after the 6 weeks summer break and that very day we went back the roof was on fire which meant another 4 weeks off school.I dont have any old photos of bermondsey but i will ask my sister in torquay to see if she has any i can put on this wonderful site,many thanks allan cooper

fosney
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Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Thu Mar 09, 2017 12:48 pm

St Olave's and St Saviour's Grammar School, Tooley Street.

Extract from Bermondsey Official Guide 1937.

At the eastern end of Tooley Street, at a point where that thoroughfare widens out and thus affords it the advantage of an open aspect, stands the imposing pile of buildings in which the united Grammar Schools of the two parishes mentioned above have had their home for the past forty-one years. Both schools were founded in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. St Saviour's was opened shortly before 1562 (it obtained its first charter in that year), on a site to the west of London Bridge. This site being appropriated for the Borough Market in 1843, the school was removed to Sumner Street. St. Olave's School was started in 1561 (securing its first charter ten years later), in buildings which were removed in 1830 to make way for the railway. The same fate befell the school's second home in Bermondsey Street, in 1849, and subsequently buildings were erected for it on the present site in Tooley Street. This is a part of the old field of Horselydown, the property of the Governors of the School since 1571, and from which they draw no inconsiderable part of their present revenue. These buildings remained until 1894, when the present school buildings, from designs by Mr Edward W Mountford, were erected at a cost of £32,000. Modern Renaissance in style, the structure was completed in 1896 and provides accommodation for about 500 boys. The foundation now includes a large school for about 500 girls in the New Kent Road (Borough of Southwark), opened by the late King George V and Queen Mary, then Prince and Princess of Wales in 1903, under ascheme uniting in this single foundation the endowments of St Olave's and St Savour's Grammar Schools, and St Thomas's and St John's Girls School, Horselydown. The accommodation of the boys' school, admirably adapted for the purpose, includes a spacious gymnasium, beneath which and corresponding in area, is a well-fitted workshop. A new wing, opened by the Lord Bishop of Southwark in September, 1929, includes a fine art room and four good classrooms. In the gymnasium may be seen the statue of Queen Elizabeth, which adorned the principal entrance to the old school. The original clock and bell have been fixed in the roof turret, whilst the old railings of wrought iron may be seen on the boundary wall. The seal of the school, dated 1576, represents the master seated in the schoolroom with five boys standing near him, the rod being a prominent object. Robert Browne, founder of the Brownists, the first of the Independent sects, was master of St Olave's School from 1586 to 1591. Browne preached the doctrine that each church or congregation is independent of all others in religious matters, etc., about 1585, but after thirty-two imprisonments he conformed to the Established Church. A brief biography of him describes him as being of a great family, and educated at Cambridge, and that "after a life of difficulties on account of religious principles and zeal, he ended his days at Northampton gaol, where he had been imprisoned for an assault," in 1633. A memorable chapter in the history of the Grammar School was the visit of King George V and Queen Mary, accompanied by Princes Mary (now the Princess Royal), on 15th February, 1918. The Royal visitors, having inspected the original charter in the court room, and visited the various class-rooms, took their places on the Head Master's platform in the common hall, where the King addressed with great earnestness the assembled scholars. King George V congratulated the school upon the fact that over a thousand old boys had joined the Army - at that time over a hundred of them had given their lives for their country - and spoke on the subject of patriotism. On leaving, the Royal party subsequently drove to the Girls' School in the New Kent Road, where His late Majesty made a speech to the 300 girls there assembled. In front of the school is a statue to Colonel Bevington. The list of alumni of St Olave's, both at home and abroad, in the scholastic as well as the administrative world, contains many names the bearers of which, by the distinguished positions they have filled in life, have shed much lustre upon the school.

During the last fifty years 205 scholarships have been won at the older Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and a constant stream of boys has proceeded to the University of London and to the Hospitals. The Indian and Home Civil Services had had their share of Olavians, and the school has sent no less than 30 men to the headships of public and other schools. There has been an unbroken tradition of academic success for over three-quarters of a century.

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fosney
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Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Thu Mar 09, 2017 12:51 pm

St Olave's and St Saviour's Grammar School, Tooley Street, Continued..

After World War II it was decided that the school should move, and in 1967/68 the school moved to Orpington. The original building was granted a Grade II Listed Building status in 1972.

In 2007 Berkeley Homes made an application to turn the building into a "Boutique Hotel" . I am not aware of what has happened since, perhaps one of our members can update us on the present situation of this building.

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fosney
Posts: 836
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Fri Mar 10, 2017 2:38 pm

Tooley Street

The former building of Boord and Sons Distillery and offices at 115/121 Tooley Street.

The building circa 1900 by Aston Webb once stretched from Tooley Street to the Riverside, at the rear being being the Distilleryy ,Bonded warehouse and riverside wharf.

It is now a Class II listed building

The property has now been converted into flats for sale and to rent at extortionate prices.

Anyone interesred in the building should read the English Heritage Architectural survey report
available on line

Boord & sons distillery office
115/121 Tooley Street. London Borough of Southwark
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fosney
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Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Fri Mar 10, 2017 3:09 pm

Tooley Street

All credits for this picture courtesy of deegs

St Olaves Library which stood on the corner of Tooley street and Potters Fields
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fosney
Posts: 836
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: Tooley Street

Postby fosney » Fri Mar 10, 2017 3:19 pm

283 Tooley Street

Picture from London Argus of 1899

At the Dockhead end of Tooley Street is another building of historic value- which no doubt most of us have passed by on many occasions. Built in 1898 the architects being Newman & Newman it was the Administration Offices of the St Olave's ( Poor Law ) Union offices

The building contained two walk-in safes in which they stored cash and goods such as boots for working men all this for the relief of the poor of the area.

With the coming of the Welfare State it was used by Social Services, first the LCC and then the Borough of Southwark, also as a Day Centre for the Elderly and Disabled.
It closed in the 1990s and was turned into apartments . The frontage looks rather dowdy but to the rear of the building is a small courtyard garden.

In today's picture we see that three apex's have been removed
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